Steve McCurry

ImageThe fact that her face is hidden gives a sense of mystery which I like. I also like the fact that she isn’t quite looking at the camera, yet you still feel a very strong connection to her.

 

Advertisements

Magnum Photographers

Quotes of Magnum Photographers That I Liked.

“Photograph things you really care about, things that really interest you, not things you feel you ought to do.” – Chris Steele-Perkins

“Try not to take pictures, which simply show what something looks like. By the way you put the elements of an image together in a frame you show us something we have never seen before and will never see again.” – Constantine Manos

(Photography) “Be proud of it, what it has, and what it can, achieve. Don’t try and reinvent the wheel. Be inspired. Try and copy, if you like (because no one can).” – Mark Power

“Find a subject you care about. Something that moves you. Something which stirs your rawest emotions. And then have patience.” – Mark Power

“I believe photography – like many other things one does in life – is the exact expression of who one is at a given moment: every time you compose and release the shutter you give voice to your thoughts and opinions of the world around you.” – Paolo Pellegrin

“Be yourself, get up early, and don’t try too hard, as whatever is trying to come out will come eventually without any effort, learn to trust your instincts and don’t think about what others will think or about the process too much. Work hard but enjoy it.” – Peter Marlow

Looking over my quotes, the common message I pick up is to photograph what you care about, in whatever way your drawn too. Don’t just show what something looks like, make it yours. You can take inspiration from others and put your own spin on it or don’t, either way the picture will end up being your own. Don’t question yourself or try too hard, photograph what moves you even if it isn’t what moves anyone else. – Cate Swenson

Magnum Photographers I Particularly Liked:

Donovan Wylie

Dennis Stock

Paolo Pellegrin

Jonas Bendiksen

Mikhail Subotzky

Steve McCurry

Donovan Wylie

This was one of my favorite pictures by Donovan Wylie. I loved the gray tones of this picture, and the texture of the sheet metal, it looks so messy but in a different way than you would usually see it because all of the lines are still clean.

Image

 

Photos of the Day

My dad picking the apples off the tree, a photojournalism assignment.

ISO 640 – f/5.0 – 1/250 sec – 50 mm

Image

ISO 640 – f/5.0 – 1/160 sec – 50 mm

Image

ISO 640 – f/5.0 – 1/160 sec – 50 mm

Image

ISO 640 – f/5.0 – 1/200 sec – 50 mm

Image

ISO 640 – f/5.0 – 1/50 sec – 50 mm

Image

ISO 640 – f/5.0 – 1/30 sec – 50 mm

Image

ISO 640 – f/5.0 – 1/50 sec – 50 mm

Image

 

Robert Frank

Robert Frank emigrated to America in 1947. He was given a grant later after becoming a photographer, from the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation in 1955, not without thanks to who was apparently his major artistic influence, photographer Walker Evans. Over the next two years, accompanied by his family for part of the time, Frank traveled on road trips all over America. Some of the cities he visited were Detroit, Savannah, Miami, Louisiana, Houston, Butte, Las Angeles, and Chicago. During his two years on the road, Frank took over 28,000 pictures. Out of this 28,000 he went on to publish only 83 in what became his most notable work, a book called The Americans.

Frank was passionate about “ documenting the tensions between optimism of the 1950’s and the realities of class and racial differences.” Robert Frank found irony in American culture that he portrayed in his pictures, this gave them an obvious sense of contrast in comparison to most contemporary American photojournalists. His use of low lighting, and odd focus and cropping set his pictures apart as well due to his straying from accepted photography techniques.

When Robert Frank started his series of America he was optimistic about the culture and society of the United States. However, his view changed as he found  that the American life was fast paced and obsessed with money. He started to see America as a quite lonely and often bleak place. This perspective and his opinions of what America was, come through in his pictures as a dark, and somewhat cold portrait of America.

Image

Jonas Bendiksen

I’m leaning towards officially announcing that my favorite photographer of the 35 Magnum Photographers I looked at  was Jonas Bendiksen, but it’s not quite true. All 35 Magnum photographers were so talented and creative, and within that group the six that I chose as my favorites I was especially taken with. It’s impossible to choose a favorite photographer out of this group,it ws overwhelming just how many picture I loved looking through them all. However, for this particular assignment, I have chosen to write about Jonas Bendiksen.

Image

This picture was the picture that originally caught my eye, it was the picture chosen as the cover of his portfolio on the blog. At first glance it’s just such an interesting picture. You wonder what it is they’re standing on, and what are those white things in the air. This picture confused me at first because the white things floating around looked like snow which contrasted with the foliage in the rest of the picture. I love all the color in this picture. I liked the metal structure, the shape of it and the way it was dented in on itself in interesting crevices. I was also drawn to the people in the picture, their posture gives a sense of casualness to what is such a bright and busy picture. I later read that the people in the picture are collecting scrap metal from the the metal structure which is actually a crashed space craft, and the white flakes are butterflies.

Image

I liked this picture immediately when I saw it because it’s so geometric and had such a nice rhythm. To me it gave off a sense of claustrophobia and crowdedness, which I found very interesting. This picture seems like the kind of picture you could stare at forever if it was blown up very large and you could see better detail in each apartment. The messiness of the picture from all the stuff hanging over ledges and out windows, adds to the feeling of being crowded. These apartment blocks have apparently been homes to communities of squatters since the 1950’s, which I thought was a bit ironic seeing as that gives off a very crowded image as well.

Image

This picture was definitely my favorite of his, I thought it was really just amazing. I love the surreality of it, it’s really quite an odd picture. It reminds me of a different picture I saw in Aperture. When I look at the picture, although they’re in the background, the mother and her stroller are really the focus of the picture. The fact that they’re the darkest thing in the picture gives off almost a creepiness. I loved the water, the mountains, the grass, and the fog. It was like a bunch of very different layers that are all beautiful in different ways. The girl playing in the field gives off a feeling of happiness and playfulness, which helps the picture feel less eerie. When all the pieces are put together, I think this photo is just very strong and very powerful.